RSS

Monthly Archives: March 2011

roll me in designer sheets…


Colour me your colour, baby
Colour me your car
Colour me your colour, darling
I know who you are
Come up off your colour chart
I know where you’re coming from
Call me on the line
Call me call me any anytime
Call me my love you can call me any day or night
Call me
Cover me with kisses, baby
Cover me with love
Roll me in designer sheets
I’ll never get enough…

I have been singing this song incorrectly for the past 20+ years. I realized my error recently when my boyfriend downloaded a karaoke software to help me practice singing Call Me by Blondie for an upcoming karaoke gathering.The first few lines of the lyrics were a surprise to both of us. I no longer recall how I previously sang these lines but I do know that the word “colour” (or “color”) did not exist in my version.

Something similar happened at the karaoke. The bar did not have the songs I had practiced so I sang Red Red Wine by UB40 and noticed that in addition to being a reggae song, it encompasses some rap rhythms.

Later that night, when a friend asked me to join her in singing Tempted by Squeeze, I was astonished that I knew most of the lyrics and the tune to a song that I had not heard since the 90s!

The unheard lyrics and the heard ones… both a surprise… amusing side effects of singing rather than simply listening.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on March 24, 2011 in karaoke, listening, lyrics, memory, singing, song

 

do musicians have better memory?


Music is a resource that tones the brain for auditory fitness,” says Nina Kraus, a prominent brain researcher at Northwestern University. She says that musical training expands a person’s “working memory.” Read more at thankyoubrain.blogspot.com. In an experiment “students with musical training recalled significantly more words than the untrained students” as explained at music improves language and memory.

Watch how a math teacher uses rap music to help students remember mathematical rules and equations.

Did you know that listening to Mozart can improve test scores and that music has been shown to help Alzheimer’s patients?

Scientists are exploring the possibilities and the mechanics of music and memory. Here are some layman thoughts, a tongue-in-cheek brain activity explanation, and a neuroscience discussion which includes fMRI photos of music’s affect on the brain’s memory centers.

Got music?

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on March 18, 2011 in memory, rap, your brain on music

 

Tags:

Amusia: an inability to process music


All music sounds like loud noise to her. She has no emotional reaction to music and does not perceive the rhythms and the melodies. It’s a condition called amusia. This is a true story. Many people have this condition at birth and sometimes they acquire it later in life.

Oliver Sack’s book Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain, Revised and Expanded Editioncontains many stories of brain anomolies as they apply to the perception of music. In this video, Sacks tells the story of a woman who cannot process music due to amusia…

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on March 4, 2011 in sound, your brain on music